1. Steve Jobs: Think Different, Think About the Box

    Posted on 23.05.18 William Reid, on Articles, Patent Trends & Activity

    In the world of electronics, no one has appreciated and successfully employed the importance of the integration of packaging design and engineering, like Apple.  Everyone in the field of intellectual property are aware of the considerable number of utility patents owned by Apple.  What they may not be as familiar with is their activity in the area of design patents.  As described in the Steve Jobs biography by Walter Isaacson, this has been due in large part to the relationship between designer, Jonathan Ive, and the brilliant Steve Jobs.  The book points out that in contrast to the typical engineering-driven design of products in most companies, at Apple, product and packaging design involves an iterative conversation between the designers and engineers to find elegant simplicity:

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  2. Will Alice Become the New Markman?

    Posted on 10.05.18 Michael Hinrichsen, on Articles, Patent Related Court Rulings, Recent News & Articles

    Buried amidst the flurry of recent Federal Circuit subject matter eligibility decisions is a question that could significantly change how Section 101 is applied in patent litigation.  Specifically, the issue is whether performing Step 2 of the Mayo/Alice test can require a factual inquiry.  If upheld, this interpretation of Alice could make patent litigation much more complicated and expensive.  In fact, Section 101 inquiries could become convoluted mini-trials in their own right – similar to how Markman hearings are performed today.

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  3. Patent Beauty: IP and the Cosmeceutical Industry

    Posted on 26.04.18 Shin Hee Lee, on Articles, Biotech/Pharma

    The cosmeceutical industry is ever more competitive and continues to grow with a myriad of new cosmeceutical products entering the market every day. Well-established and new companies are busily adapting to new trends created by people’s changing tastes. The total revenue of the U.S. cosmeceutical industry has only been increasing since 2009, marking $62.46 billion in 2016. While this revenue comes from a number of cosmeceutical product categories, skin care has always been the most profitable category, covering 36% of the global market.

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  4. Rising Temperatures – Federal Circuit Warming to Patent Eligibility of Medical Diagnostics

    Posted on 18.04.18 Michael Hinrichsen, on Articles, Patent Related Court Rulings, Patent Trends & Activity

    For the first time since the Mayo Supreme Court decision of 2012, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) in Exergen vs Kaz has ruled in favor of the patent eligibility of a medical diagnostic invention.  While nonprecedential, this 2-to-1 decision is noteworthy for the guidance it provides to patent professionals seeking to protect diagnostic inventions.  Specifically, it instructs that diagnostic methods may be eligible for patent coverage so long as they use unconventional methods for detecting analytes.  Additionally, the Exergen decision offers another endorsement of the view put forth recently by the CAFC in Berkheimer v. HP and Aatrix v. Green Shades, that the inventive concept analysis that can arise in step-2 of the Mayo/Alice test is at least in part a factual question and not just a question of law.  This factual vs legal debate continues to have reverberations throughout the patent law field, affecting both the manner in which courts conduct 101 examinations as well as the conclusions they reach.

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  5. Local Company Brings National Distributor to Court On Trademark Infringement Claim

    Posted on 11.04.18 Frederick Spaeth, on Articles, Trademarks

    The U.S. District Court of Connecticut has ruled that a small Connecticut manufacturing company can sue an Indiana- based national manufacturer and wholesaler for trademark infringement in Connecticut, based on the defendant’s modest sales to distributors in Connecticut.  This illustrates how Connecticut courts provide an important forum for Connecticut business to protect their brands against out-of-state competitors that sell into Connecticut.

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  6. The I-O Movement:  Priming the Immune System to Fight Cancer – Part I:  Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR-T) Cell Technology

    Posted on 27.03.18 David Puleo, on Articles, Biotech/Pharma

    There has been a lot of recent buzz about chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell technology.  Novartis and Gilead have FDA-approved CAR-T therapies offering complete patient remission from certain cancers.  A flood of new CAR-based technologies is likely to hit the market.  As with any novel therapy, patent protection is essential.  The large number of patent filings suggest that intellectual property protection is an important part of the research efforts in this field.  The bolded patent documents cited in this article are further summarized in the table at the end of this installment.

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  7. Protecting Pharmaceuticals at the Intersection of Patent and Regulatory Law

    Posted on 14.03.18 John Wizeman, on Articles, Biotech/Pharma, Recent News & Articles

    Over three decades ago, the United States Congress passed the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act[1]. This piece of legislation, known as the Hatch-Waxman Act, tackled the difficult task of protecting pharmaceutical innovator intellectual property while ultimately providing increased competition and decreased cost to consumers through accessible generic drugs. This legislative task was accomplished with two pieces of intersecting laws:  (i) the patent provisions under 35 USC which provide for up to five additional years of patent term extension and (ii) the drug exclusivity provisions under 21 USC 355 which provide certain regulatory and marketing exclusivity periods upon drug approval.  The intersection of these patent and regulatory/marketing exclusivity periods provide innovator drug developers with a net exclusivity period. Given the immense monetary and time investment for developing new drugs, maximizing this net exclusivity should be a major focus of patent practitioners in the pharmaceutical field. By maximizing this net exclusivity, innovator drug developers can recoup their investment, as well as provide a stable foundation and incentive for continued drug discovery. To understand how to maximize this window, those involved need to understand the important role this intersection of patent and regulatory law holds.

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  8. The Emergent Microbiome: A Revolution for the Life Sciences – Part XIV, Revisiting Immunotherapy and Combination Therapies

    Posted on 08.03.18 David Puleo, on Articles, Biotech/Pharma, The Emergent Microbiome Series

    Three recent articles in Science discuss how the composition of the gut microbiome affects anti-PD-1 therapy for the treatment of melanoma, metastatic melanoma, and epithelial tumors, further bolstering the idea of gauging immunotherapeutic efficacy based on one’s microbiome composition.  We first reviewed this concept in Part VIII of The Emergent Microbiome Series and are revisiting it here.  Bolded patent documents are further summarized in the table at the end of this installment.

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  9. U.S. Tops Leaderboard on Chamber of Commerce 2018 IP Index – Slips to #13 in Patent Protection

    Posted on 20.02.18 David Puleo, on Articles, Patent Trends & Activity, Recent News & Articles

    The United States Chamber of Commerce (USCC) released the 6th Edition of the International IP Index on its Global Intellectual Property Center (GIPC) website last week.  The Index highlights the importance of establishing a strong intellectual property infrastructure to catalyze economic growth, development, and innovation.

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  10. Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part XI, Cosmeceuticals

    Posted on 14.02.18 Jing Zhou, on Articles, Biologics/biosimilars, Nanomedicine Series

    In previous installments of Nanomedicine, we have discussed the usage of nanoparticles in cancer and other diseases as both diagnostics and therapeutic agents. See, for example, magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics (Part VIII and Part X), quantum dots for bioimaging (Part VII), nanoparticles as cancer biomarkers (Part VI) and for cancer therapy (Part V), and nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers (Part IV).  These applications of nanotechnology not only have attracted increased attention from pharmaceutical companies and academic researchers, but have led to the development of innovative candidatesin clinic trials and even successful products selling in global markets. Beyond this thriving therapeutic field, another huge market for utilizing nanotechnology that might not be as widely recognized, but which already has had a great impact, is the market for cosmeceuticals.

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